The Big Redhead Book

St. Martin’s Press / 240 pages / $14.99 / ISBN-13: 978-1250110527

Available at Amazon

Barnes & Noble

Indiebound

iTunes

The Big Redhead Book: Inside the Secret Society of Red Hair is an inside look into one of the most elite societies in the world — the real two percent. Well, you know, the two percent of the world’s population that are natural redheads, at least. This book has equal parts pop culture, ginger facts, and humorous stories about what it’s like to actually have red hair. It’s loaded with everything you’d ever want to know about us reds; how we’re scientifically different from the norms (non-redheads), how we’ve been stereotyped in pop culture, and the do’s and don’ts of having a red in your life, among other things!

Whether you are a redhead, know a redhead, or are just an enthusiast, this book explores the realities, the myths, and where red hair actually originates (it’s not Ireland). Author Erin La Rosa not only delivers the facts, statistics, and undeniable realities of being a ginger, but she also weaves in her own personal and hilarious stories about being red. Being a redhead is not just a hair color, it’s a lifestyle―and this book is your own exclusive peek into that fabulous world.

Some surprising facts about redheads that you will discover include:
– The association between redheads and humor came from redheaded slaves in ancient Greece
– There are over 30 leading or recurring redhead characters in Disney and Pixar films… that’s a lot when you remember we’re only two percent of the world’s population!
– Redhead women allegedly have more sex, more threesomes, and more orgasms than other women… or do they? Let’s find out!
– Some Egyptian rulers dyed their hair red to assert their power (looking at you, Cleopatra)
– And redheads need more anesthesia at the dentist, because they’re not going down without a fight

Womanskills

Voyageur Press / 224 pages / $15.99 / ISBN-13: 978-0760350188
Available at Amazon

Praise for Womanskills:

  • “This is the smartest, funniest, most patient friend you can get in book form without that book actually being haunted.” —Kristin Chirico, senior editor, BuzzFeed
  • “Even though I live with a woman, and even lived inside one for a while, until recently I had no way to help them, because I’m a man. Now, however, I can just hand them a copy of the funny, thoughtful Womanskills.” – Rob Delaney
  • “This wise, irreverent compendium of life hacks finds the sweet spot between Amy Sedaris and Worst Case Survival Guides, filling in a much-needed gap in every woman’s bag of tricks. An instant classic.” – Janet Fitch, author of White Oleander and Paint It Black
  • “Erin brings her unique brand of charm, cheek, and fierceness to this much-needed how-to guide. Womanskills are human skills, but the voice speaks directly to my powerful generation of ladies. I now know that my bras don’t fit, my salary could be higher, and I totally should have proposed to my husband instead.” – Jessie Rosen, Time Top 25 Blogger, founder of 20-Nothings.com
  • “In Womanskills, La Rosa is that know-it-all friend who you don’t want to punch in the face. Because she’s hilarious and has lots of great advice for navigating that weird period when you’re supposed to be an adult but have absolutely no idea how to be.” – Lilibet Snellings, author of BOX GIRL: My Part-Time Job as an Art Installation
  • “I have come to count on Erin for her practical and hilarious wisdom. With Womanskills, you too will have access to her advice-from how to cook like a real adult person to how to survive being single again.” – Lucy Keating, author of Dreamology

9 Steps To Landing A Book Agent

So, recently this amazing thing happened where I sold a book:MyEditor

I wept, openly and freely, because as any writer knows the dream is to sell a book. The crazy thing is that THE BIG REDHEAD BOOK, which is the book I just sold, is now officially going to be my second book. I’m currently finishing up the draft for my first book, Womanskills. 2015 was quite a year.

But onto the important stuff: How does one get an agent so that you can then sell a book? I didn’t have an agent for Womanskills (pre-order the book here), as that was a writer-for-hire situation. So I’ll focus on how I got my agent, the incredible Kristyn Keene at ICM, in the hopes that you can get one too (if you’re so inclined).

And because I’m a big fan of steps, lists, and everything easy to read, I’ll try to make this a step-by-step guide.

Step 1:

Get an idea for a book you want to write. OK, that one’s pretty obvious, but it’s literally the first thing you need to do to even consider an agent. You need a great idea, whether it’s fiction or nonfiction, and you need to make sure it’s great.

Step 2:

Get to writing. Most nonfiction doesn’t require you write an entire book before you sell it, and this is also the case for some fiction as well (particularly YA fiction). But you will need a really great query letter, which will be the thing you send to an agent before they even consider reading your work. And at minimum a proposal that you can send to an agent when they ask for more materials. Your proposal should include a fully written sample chapter, information about your “platform,” about you as a writer, and a whole host of other things that I’ll cover in another post.

  •  But query letters are a little simpler, so what’s in a query letter? A query letter is what hooks an agent in. It’s what will get you a foot in the door, and it’s extremely important.
  • Since I had never written a query letter, (or a proposal), I did a ton of research online. I saw a lot of “How to write a query letter” articles, and samples you can look through. In the end, I wound up investing in editing services and used a writer who’s been published and clearly knows a thing or two about selling a book. This was a really important book idea to me, so I wanted to make sure I did everything correctly.
  • What I learned from the query process is this: It should be a page in length max, and it needs to have all of the juiciest information you got (your social media stats, why this book is important, and how the hell you’re going to make it a bestseller).
Step 3:

Research agents and agencies. I spent a lot of time doing this. Crazy amounts. And it was hard. The two biggest tips I can give are 1) Look at books that are similar to yours, 2) Google search who repped those books (something like, “Agent for Zombie Survival Guide” is all you need) and 3) Get a subscription to Publisher’s Marketplace so you can look up those agents.

So, for example, when I looked up Kristyn Keene on Publisher’s Marketplace, I saw that she was a noted agent for a lot of the categories my Big Redhead Book fell into. (OK, I don’t know if I’ll be including any diet tips for redheads, but for sure it’ll be chock-full of humor and all the pop culture you can stand.)

kristyn

Step 4:

Email out your query letter and wait. Wait a long time.

Step 5:

Just know you will get rejections. So prepare yourself emotionally for that, and maybe come up with a little ritual to go with each rejection. (My ritual was any time I got a rejection, I went to get an ice cream. I ate loads of ice cream.)

Step 6:

If the universe is good, you’ll get positive responses from an agent and they’ll usually ask to see your material. Send it over! Then you wait. My big advice here is not to pester or poke that agent unless you absolutely need to (aka another agent is interested). If they asked to see your stuff, they’ll read it, and it will all be fine.

Step 7:

They want to talk to you. OMFG, first of all do a happy dance, because THAT’S EXCITING. It’s been my experience, from talking to others and from my own stuff, that if an agent wants to talk to you, they’d like to rep you. So unless you totally blow the whole thing, you’ve got an agent. All it takes is one agent to try and sell your book, so one agent is an amazing thing!

  • Hop on the phone with them and ask a lot of questions! Things like, “Where do you see this book landing?” “What would be your selling strategy?” “What changes would you make to the proposal?”
  • Treat this chat exactly as you would a job interview. You’re interviewing them to be your potential rep, and they’re likewise interviewing you to see if they’d like to work with you.
  • Feel free to ask if you can speak to some of their other clients to get a sense of how they are as an agent. I did this with Kristyn, and it was super helpful to hear her clients gush about her.
  • If you’re talking to multiple agents, it’s customary to not have an answer for them right away. You can say, “I’m talking to multiple agents, and I’ll get back to you within a week with my decision.”
Step 8:

Make your decision. Smaller agencies might ask you to sign an agency agreement, and those agreements can be LONG. So if you get one, look it over carefully and make sure you aren’t signing your entire creative life away. ICM had me sign an agreement for this book which was all of a paragraph.

Step 9:

TREAT YOURSELF to something very nice — a personal large pizza and wine, for example — because while this whole process can be incredibly stressful, getting an agent means you’re on your way to book town.

Also, it’s important to note that while getting an agent is one of the best ways to sell a book, it’s not the only way. If you spoke with one agent, and you didn’t get a great vibe from them, then don’t agree to let them manage your book. This is your baby, and you can peddle your book idea to smaller publishers to get the result you actually want.

How To Write An Amazing Plot Twist

I love a good page turner. There are few things more satisfying to me then starting a book and not physically being able to put it down. So much so that you look up from said book only to realize that you’ve been in your pajamas all day, and now it’s nighttime.

Such was the wonderful case when I read Jessie Rosen’s Dead Ringer — a YA novel that is chock-full of secrets, and has one of the most amazing plot twists I’ve ever read. Seriously, this plot twist will make you scream. I was yelling at this book. I didn’t know I was capable of that.

Which is why I asked Jessie for advice on how to write a great plot twist. Not only because I aspire to be a writer like Jessie someday, but because I wanted a look inside the mind of someone who came up with this plot twist. Jessie, in turn, wrote all about it for today’s guest post. Her advice is, as always, on point and full of unexpected turns! Buy Dead Ringer here so we can discuss this plot twist together, please.DeadRingerCover

How To Write An Amazing Plot Twist, by Jessie Rosen

There is little I love more than a gasp-inducing, throw-the-book-across-the-room, shout a four-letter-word plot twist. BRUCE WILLIS IS ALSO DEAD?! SHE’S HER SISTER AND HER DAUGHTER?! HANS WAS EVIL ALL ALONG??!!

But loving them and writing one are two very different things. And yet, when conceiving of the idea behind my first YA novel, DEAD RINGER, plot twist was the whole point. I (like to) think I pulled it off (Erin thought so!). Here are my tips for twisting a plot so hard it makes your reader’s heads spin.

STEP ONE: Start with a completely insane idea that you’ll never be able to pull off

The twist wasn’t an after thought for DEAD RINGER; it was the entire pitch. I started with, imagine if __________?!?! And then I spent at least a month thinking, nope, too ridiculous. Coming up with a way for it to not be complete and utter insanity was my job. It can be tricky to reverse engineer a twist into an existing world. I recommend twisting first and straightening second. Also good advice when dancing.

STEP TWO: Decide when and how you’re going to do the big reveal

Again, work backwards. If you know when and how you’d like to spill the story’s biggest beans you can figure out how much meat you need before and after that moment. I wanted a very late shock ala GIRL ON A TRAIN, but a book like GONE GIRL features a mid-point reveal which is equally excellent. Pick the “Girl” you prefer, but know before you go.

STEP THREE: Select your red herrings

Herrings, plural. When developing characters to fill out your world you need to consider who we’ll think is involved in the mystery and why. I have one sort of red herring and one real red herring (and as much pickled herring as possible, always). A lot of plot came from that fact and needed to be carefully woven.

STEP FOUR: Never ever lie to your reader

You’re keeping a big, big secret, but every detail still has to make sense when the reader finds out what’s been up all along. It’s so fun to play with dialogue, language and description that dances that like (watch THE SIXTH SENSE for a master class), but do not step over!

STEP FIVE: pour everything you’ve got into your big reveal scene

In DEAD RINGER I reveal the twist to the audience in once scene but to a character in another. Double bang for my buck! Both of those moments were my absolute favorites to write and, shockingly, came the easiest. What does this say about my mental state? Let’s not dwell on that.

And finally STEP SIX: Read as many twisted plot examples as you possibly can

Getting it right is about feeling what works and doesn’t from your own reader’s ear. There are a lot of ways to skin a cat (please forgive the aggressive cat-related saying, Erin), but this is your big Hitchcock moment, so you get to make it your own.

Good luck! God speed! Coffee helps! Can’t wait to read it.

What I’ve Learned From Writing A Book

I’ve been hiding the fact that I’ve been working on a book for a long time, because I was so terrified something might go wrong, but I’m ready to talk about it. (Stay with me here.)

Writing a book

So… I’M WRITING A BOOK! I’m sure anyone who gets a book deal will say this, but I’ve always wanted to write a book, and it’s so exciting that when I think about it my throat catches and I feel like I might scream. I’M SO EXCITED.

It’s a humor how-to guide called Womanskills, and it will likely hit bookshelves next October, or so my editor tells me. (My Editor, this is such a nice thing to say.)

I’ve quietly been writing the outline, which was approved. Then I wrote the first chapter, which has now been approved. And I’ll be working on the rest of the book over the next few months. It’ll all be done by January, and because I’ve been happily thrown into this, I feel like I now have some takeaways.

  • Procrastination and writer’s block will happen. Like, you think that maybe turning on HGTV for “background noise” will help you get in the zone, and then an hour later you realize your new zone is just watching TV. Personally, I’ve tried to put a time limit on those things, so if I start procrastinating, I give myself an hour, then it’s back to writing and turning off the internet. See evidence of procrastination below:

Decided to take a selfie while working on my book, because I’ve run out of ways to procrastinate. 📖📚💻

A photo posted by Erin La Rosa (@sideofginger) on

    • It’s OK to not talk about your book until you’re really ready to do so. I took a full month to tell people. I mean, I immediately told my cat, E, my parents, my closest friends, and sometimes would just mumble it to myself, but I didn’t start conversations with it. It’s totally fine to be nervous, and to keep exciting things close to you. And yes, people will be mad that you didn’t tell them, saying things like, “Why didn’t you tell me?!” but like, pat them on the back and reassure them that your crippling anxiety really needed this secrecy.

 

  • However, at some point you should let yourself be excited and share the great news. (See this blog post, for example.)

 

 

  • Find a spot that really makes you want to write. I used to think that spot was on my couch, until I kept trying to watch TV. Then I tried my bed, and I kept napping. But the library? Yes, I work quite well in a library. Libraries are quiet and there’s no TV, which for me was basically what I needed. #librariesforever

 

 

  • And when you do something, like find your idea for a book, or finish an outline or a chapter or a whole book, celebrate by doing something you had to put off while writing. Like on Sunday I submitted my chapter, so I watched episodes of Hannibal and sat in my pajamas without typing. That was totally lovely.

 

 

On My Life As A Writing Impostor

I recently read this non-fiction book called The Empathy Exams by Leslie Jamison, which I really loved. It’s a book of essays about a lot of things, like the author communicating with a prison penpal and trying to understand what his life is like, Leslie’s one-time job as a medical actor and having to elicit empathy from the med students, dating a poet in New Orleans and dealing with the way he described his feelings…

Leslie also talks at length about being a writer. She says the phrase, “while writing this essay,” frequently in the book, and acknowledges that her job is writing.

This bothered me.

I also realized that in Amy Poehler’s book, Yes Please, it had bothered me when Amy referenced writing a book, or the act of having to write and how hard it was. That bothered me even more.

But why did it bug me? What is so wrong with someone acknowledging that they are a writer when, in fact, I’m reading their book? It’s not some secret. It’s a book. I’m reading it. They wrote it. So why not mention that they’re a writer? It’s part of their life, and I was reading about their life.

I’ve thought about this a lot, and the problem isn’t Leslie or Amy, it’s me. I’ve always been uncomfortable calling myself a writer. So when I see other people do it so effortlessly, it pains me, because I wish I could do that too.

Having a reading of a musical I’m developing with @lydjaaah and @jhotogo today. (Squeeee!!)

A photo posted by Erin La Rosa (@sideofginger) on

I remember when I first moved to LA, I went to lunch with a successful musician friend —successful in that he gets paying gigs regularly and that’s his sole source of income. Anyway, I was asking his advice on what to do with my life: I wanted to be a writer, but how? And was it even possible? I just wanted to be paid to write full-time. That was my dream. ~The dream~

He told me something so important. He said, “Stop saying you want to be a writer, and say that you are a writer. You are a writer.”

He told me that if I wanted to get jobs — and I did — then I shouldn’t tell people I was “an aspiring writer,” because no one wants to hire an aspiring anything. They want to hire the real thing.

I took his advice, and the more I started cover letters with “I’m a writer,” the more I got paid to write. When people asked what I did for a living, I answered, “I’m a writer,” even if I only had one paying job that month, and even when I was in grad school, working to become a writer and felt so far away from success. “I’m a writer” became part of my conversations. But every time I said it, I felt like an impostor. My friend told me, essentially, to fake it till I made it, and that’s exactly how I still feel a lot of the time: like I’m a fake.

I was so bothered by this recently that I actually Googled “writing impostor” LOL. Like, what the hell was I expecting to find, really?! I’m not sure, but what I did find was this article on The Hairpin, quite literally titled, “Do You Have Impostor Syndrome?” I clicked the shit out of that.

Turns out that the author, Jazmine Hughes, was describing exactly how I felt. She had her work published places, she’s an editor and writer, and yet… is that enough?

I’ve written for BuzzFeed, Funny or Die, Ecorazzi, E!, and Storychord, among other places. My dream of being paid to write is actually happening for me. I am paid to write. So… aren’t I a writer now? Yeah… but I just still feel so much phoniness even typing that. It helped to see that “Impostor Syndrome” is actually a thing. It was comforting to read other people’s experiences with it (including some of my BuzzFeed colleagues’), and know that I’m NOT ALONE. But to be honest, I’m still not entirely sure what it would take for me to say the words “I’m a writer” and feel confident in that.

Maybe I’ll never feel truth in those words, because being a writer has been the thing I’ve wanted my entire life. I’ve built it up so much, that maybe nothing will ever be quite good enough. Regardless, I will always remember my friend’s advice: say you’re a writer. You are a writer. Fake it.

So, hello, my name is Erin La Rosa. I’m a writer. (We’re in this together if you also have these feels.)

Belated Resolution: Make More Time For Writing, And Less For Bullshit

It’s April, and yet here I am just now making a New Year’s resolution. The only really great thing to come out of E being gone on set for a month (other than the fact that, ya know, he filmed a pilot) was that I had a lot more time to myself and a lot more time to write.

I wrote when I woke up, and then a bit when I got home, and got into the habit of writing or reading rather than what I’d usually do. (Watch TV, troll Facebook, check Instagram, stare into the fridge until some food spoke to me.)

I forgot how much can be accomplished in a day, even a weekday when you’re working and come home slightly exhausted. Still being able to continue writing and get something of your own done feels… pretty great, really. And on the weekends, there were often entire days where I did nothing but write. I’m currently working on two side projects that I’m really excited about, and most important is that they just make me plain happy to work on.

E is oddly enough also in a place where he has to spend his downtime working on writing and reading. (For him it’s reading other writers scripts and working on his series document.) It’s actually been nice. He can read a script, and I can read Infinite Jest. (I never read this book before, because I was intimidated by the length, but I have to say that I’m loving it. It’s weird and funny and very inspiring.) On the weekends, he can work on his pilot material, and I can work on my own projects.

I don’t know what will come of these projects. Hopefully one will be published, and the other will be seen. Worst case scenario is that I’ve spent a lot of time on something I really enjoy, so it’s not a bad situation to be in at all. It also, of course, means slightly less blogging on my end. Not that blogging is part of the bullshit I’m spending less time on, god knows I love blogging, and I’m determined to do at least two posts a week.

So there you have it: my belated new year’s resolution is now in full swing. Plus, I’ve written it on this blog, so other people can now hold me accountable and potentially shame me if I start slacking. (Feel free to shame me, btw. Shame is an oddly motivating force that is entirely underrated.)

Why Dickson Street Bookshop in Fayetteville, Arkansas Is Worth A Visit

When I was visiting E and his family over the Christmas break, one of the places I really wanted to visit was the Dickson Street Bookshop.

Fayetteville is a small, college town, and there are only a few main drags of stores to explore. One of those streets is Dickson, which has quite a number of bars, and the book shop is smack in the middle of it.

I wanted to visit the shop because it specializes in out-of-print books, is one of those rare gems you definitely don’t see in Los Angeles, and most importantly, it’s been owned and operated by E’s dad since 1978.
Book Shop

This dapper man is E’s dad. He gets up very early and goes into the store every day to check inventory and sell books. Pretty cool dude, right?Dickson.jpg

There are so many beautiful editions of books that it was hard to capture them all, but I tried!Dickson Bookshop.jpg

And then there are the modern touches, like this little slice of Chuck Palahnuik heaven.Chuck Palahniuk

I really enjoyed the music section, mainly because of this “Stones” marker.Bookshelf Glory

Eoghan and Charles

E and his dad.

At one point Charles, that’s E’s dad, gave me a brown shopping bag and told me to “get whatever” I wanted. I felt like I was on an episode of Supermarket Sweep, where I’d have to just run through each and every aisle and try to dump as many books as I possibly could into my bag.

Unfortunately, I wasn’t very good at the whole “endless options” thing. There were so many aisles, so many sections, and so many beautiful book spines to pet. I ended up wandering into the foreign aisle, and leaving with a bunch of Spanish language flashcards. (No joke.)Eoghan in Dickson Bookshop

Jack Kerouac

Man Booker prize winnersThe best part about this store is all of the independent touches. Unlike a Barnes & Noble or Borders (R.I.P.), every inch of this bookshop is unique. There are handwritten signs, little details, like the Man Booker prize winners, and a seemingly endless supply of witty New Yorker cartoons cut out and tacked to the wall like art.

It was such a special place, and really reminded me of the importance of supporting independent sellers. If you’re ever looking for an out-of-print title, or a unique gift to give someone that is truly one of a kind, Dickson Bookshop sells and ships all of its titles via Abe Books. (Lucky for all of us!)

Oh, except the Spanish language flashcards. Those came home with me.

New Year, New Bucket List Updates

I decided to write a bucket list for myself a few years ago, because of this MTV show that inspired me, as silly as that might sound. (Did anyone else watch The Buried Life?)Shark Dive

And ever since making that list, I’ve been crossing things off of it, slowly but surely. It hasn’t been a quick process, but I’m still amazed by the number of things I’ve been able to accomplish ever since making this. Maybe it’s like that book I never read, The Secret, and this list somehow acts as my dream board.

Either way, I thought it would be a good idea to remind myself of what I still need to accomplish. And the great news is that one of these things is already in the works! (See #46)

1- Swim with sharks

2- Hike in Alaska

3- Host Saturday Night Live

4- Walk across the Great Wall of China

5- Perform standup

6-  Write a book

7- Write a play

8- Visit Cinque Terre

9- Learn Italian

10- Learn how to make sushi

11- Go to a restaurant and buy dinner for a random family (anonymously)

12- Start a foundation

13- Volunteer in India

14- See the Taj Mahal

15- Meet  Josh Groban

16- Feed a village in Africa

17- Sing a song with a live band in front of an audience

18- Party at the Playboy mansion

19- Write an article for The New Yorker

20- Be on NPR

21- Walk in a protest

22- Win an award for teaching

23- Go to Paris for a weekend. Tell no one.

24- Go to the Oscars

25- Be a guest on the Tonight Show

26- Get a PhD

27- Ring the bell at the NYSE

28- Help build a house

29- Go camping

30- Skinny dip

31- Sky dive

32- Travel through wine country

33- Go to the X Games

34- Go to the Olympics

35- Go to the Superbowl

36- Go to the World Series

37- Have a sketch on Funny or Die

38- Teach my mom how to swim (She refuses to learn. I am determined.)

39- Go apple picking

40- Have a sandwich named after me

41- Learn the thriller dance

42- Be on a float in a parade (I rode in a cop car during a parade as a prize for winning a slogan contest. Doesn’t count.)

43- Mardi Gras in New Orleans

44- Carnival in Brazil

45- Zip line in Costa Rica (I’m crossing this one out, as I recently zip lined in California!)

46- Go to Sundance — UPDATE! I will be attending Sundance as a reporter for BuzzFeed this year. So, this will be crossed off starting Jan. 16!

47- Build a successful website (this one!)

48- Go on a yoga retreat

49- Have/be on a billboard in Times Square

50- Interview a polygamist

51- Ride in a car with a storm chaser

52- Visit and bet on the Kentucky Derby

53- Get a tattoo

54- Complete the Sunday New York Time’s crossword puzzle

55- Learn how to play chess

56- Take a photography class

57- Visit Forks with Gabby and Kristen, go on Twilight tour

58- Bike across America

59- See a moose in the wild

60- Go to a speakeasy in NYC

61- Make dinner for friends once a month (STARTED)

62- Make Thanksgiving dinner

63- Be backstage at the Hollywood Bowl

New additions:

64- Have a play produced and put up

65- Publish a book

66- Have a non-fiction story published

Sensing a theme on those new goals? I’ll be upping my writing game in 2014!

Do you have a bucket list? If so, do any of them line up with mine? Because I could use a partner in crime for some of these!

The Benefits of Writing, In Infograph Form

Infographics are pretty much the best thing since cream cheese filled bagel holes. (And yes, those are a thing that exists IRL.) Maybe it’s because my attention span is shot, or I just like to look at pretty things. Either way, I found these badass graphics that relate to writing and wanted to share.

This first one is about the physical act of writing and how it affects our brain. I thought it was interesting to see that writing can have the same calming effects as meditation, that telling a story with emotion can force your readers to connect in a different way, and that books have 50% more rare words than TV. (So, TV writing could stand to get a bit smarter. If for no other reason than people need some intellectual stimulation.)

What Writing Does To Your Brain

This second graphic surprised me quite a bit. I usually get a little sleepy when I drink beer. Interesting to see, though, that by having one beer, you can actually be more creative.

Coffee vs. BeerDrink up, writers!